Monday, 31 December 2012 21:00

The Search for Justice Is a Must in the Year of Faith: Main Topic of the Message of the President of the Teresian Association.

1231-1ROME, Italy


Maite Uribe, President of the Teresian Association, in a message sent to all the members of the Association, invites us to start the New Year with Mary’s attitude, as expressed in her Magnificat: “Learn from Mary to proclaim that the God who works marvels in her is the faithful God who commits himself day by day, year by year, to each person and to each generation. He is the merciful God who exalts the lowly and fills the hungry with good things, the God of tenderness and faithfulness who enters history to prepare ways of peace and justice.”

The President of the Teresian Association states that “a Work called to be embodied in a diverse and plural world where problems, challenges and demands have reached astronomical dimensions, needs a broad and open vision, capacity to discern in order to challenge what goes against the dignity of the human person, from the strength of the charism received. In this way new opportunities for humanisation and the coming of the Kingdom can be created.”

“This year, for us, the search for justice in all situations is imperative.
It has to be reflected in personal relationships, in the exercise of our profession, in family and social relationships and in every variety of challenge and struggle against poverty and exclusion.”  The last General Assembly of the Teresian Association, celebrated in August 2012, called us to “do justice.”

This challenge is a “Gospel response to a globalised and interdependent world situation, which generates situations of injustice, is found above all in day to day life. It is in the simplicity of daily life, in concrete actions, that we make choices and new prophetic dreams and ideals are made possible.”  This is an urgent call according to the ethical and social commitment of Saint Pedro Poveda:  “I, who have my head and heart in the present time. . . need to say to those who do not see this: inform yourselves of what is happening."

Also,  Maite Uribe reminds us with St. Augustine that “Where there is no love there can be no justice.The identifier for all that we can do to serve justice is love.”  She invites us to live the beatitudes as an ethical response in the present cultural context:  “We often hear that the Beatitudes are the heart of Christian ethics, not because they are norms or laws, but because they express a lifestyle, based on freedom and love, a lifestyle that Jesus himself lived and proclaimed, a lifestyle that was challenging and did not leave people untouched: Why does your Master eat with publicans and sinners? (Mt 9:11).”

“To value justice as much as life inevitably involves conflict and differences and this requires clarity, a critical capacity to detect unjust systems and take a stand based on Gospel criteria. This is the
price that Jesus paid and led him to give up his life: No one takes my life from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. (John 10:18)”

“Blessed are you who believed”

The following are key paragraphs from the message of Maite Uribe, President of the Teresian Association, for the year 2013.

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord!
The Almighty works marvels for me!

He raises the lowly! 

He fills the hungry with good things!

We will start a new year, which for us, as believers, is an invitation to believe and proclaim, as Mary did, that God will work marvels, for his mercy is from age to age, from generation to generation, thus fulfilling the promise made to our ancestors.

Mary’s attitude, proclaimed in the Magnificat, is what I would like to have as our companion throughout the year 2013, so that we learn from Mary to proclaim that the God who works marvels in her is the faithful God who commits himself day by day, year by year, to each person and to each generation. He is the merciful God who exalts the lowly and fills the hungry with good things, the God of tenderness and faithfulness who enters history to prepare ways of peace and justice.

At the beginning of the Teresian Association, when Pedro Poveda was seeking inspiration, strength and confidence, he looked to Mary, and in Covadonga he entrusted the Work that needed help, strength and comfort to her because, it was so small. It needed everything that a maternal gaze can give.

At the dawn of the second centenary, we also need to look to Mary, the mother of Jesus, the simple and humble woman of Nazareth, the woman of faith in whom God found grace, hospitality and availability so that his Word could become flesh, life and hope in her.

As Teresian Association, the echoes of the first centenary are alive in us and as a pilgrim people who begin their second centenary, we want to be renewed by the same experience lived by Pedro Poveda in Covadonga: In front of the image of the “Santina” I prayed, planned, saw, as it were, the development of the Work.1

A Work called to be embodied in a diverse and plural world where problems, challenges and demands have reached astronomical dimensions, needs a broad and open vision, capacity to discern in order to challenge what goes against the dignity of the human person, from the strength of the charism received. In this way new opportunities for humanisation and the coming of the Kingdom can be created.

Supported by Mary’s faith and the Magnificat we welcome the invitation of the XVII General Assembly to live and respond profoundly to a strong call to justice, convinced that it is actions that give witness to who we are2. This is our joint task throughout this coming year.

We will allow ourselves to be challenged by the voice of the prophet Micah and with him imagine what God expects of us in this year of justice, which fits so well in the whole Church’s Year of Faith. In the time of Micah, Jerusalem was a city dominated by social injustice, injustice that scandalously magnified the difference between those who were fortunate and those who were less so, a city where false religious security betrayed a completely superficial religious belief.

Micah bravely and courageously raised his voice against this situation, in some aspects similar to ours, and he proclaimed: 
        

You have already been told what is right and what the Lord wants of you: to do justice, and to love kindness, and to walk humbly with your God. (Micah 6:8)

To do justice: To value justice as much as we value life3

At a time in history when complex social and economic situations threaten the dignity of each person and the value of life, Pedro Poveda’s invitation becomes urgent; it becomes an invitation with a purpose that needs a courageous, decisive and real response.

The Council for Culture, in its latest report, draws our attention to the reality of the current world situation. It is a reality that requires “a courageous and prophetic intervention”4.

The cycle of recent General Assemblies has signalled this same urgency and has prompted a better understanding of our own spirituality of incarnation in the relationship between faith - cultures-justice. This is not conceived as being linear but dynamic, seeking to propose, not a position excludes but one which is inclusive and integrates.

The Gospel response to a globalised and interdependent world situation, which generates situations of injustice, is found above all in day to day life. It is in the simplicity of daily life, in concrete actions, that we make choices and new prophetic dreams and ideals are made possible. I, who have my head and heart in the present time. . . need to  say to those who do not see this: inform yourselves of what is happening5.

This year, for us, the search for justice in all situations is imperative. It has to be reflected in personal relationships, in the exercise of our profession, in family and social relationships and in every variety of challenge and struggle against poverty and exclusion6.

We often hear that the Beatitudes are the heart of Christian ethics, not because they are norms or laws, but because they express a lifestyle, based on freedom and love, a lifestyle that Jesus himself lived and proclaimed, a lifestyle that was challenging and did not leave people untouched: Why does your Master eat with publicans and sinners? (Mt 9:11).

To value justice as much we value life means to live the challenge of love, justice and peace, based on the Beatitudes: Blessed are they who hunger and thirst for justice (Mt 5:6) It is revealing that for Jesus those who are blessed are not the conquerors, but the persecuted, not the powerful but the poor and the hungry, not the conformists, but those who are badly treated.

To value justice as much as we value life means to be invited to look at the world with eyes of faith and from the perspective of the opportunities we have to work for an alternative globalisation, to create networks with others to build in plurality to safeguard the earth we inhabit and foster experiences of solidarity, justice and peace. This can lead us to ask ourselves, with others: what kind of development are we looking for? What kind of development is possible, just, good and true, the kind that respects the limited resources of our planet, cares for them and distributes them equally?

To value justice as much as we value life is to commit ourselves to a world available to all: to look after it, respect it, safeguard its future so it belongs to everyone. This requires us to be attentive to the destructive force of the present crisis which includes among other things land speculation, housing crisis for young families, unsustainable unemployment levels, separation of families as a result of job pressures, the requirement to migrate in search of shelter.

To value justice as much as life inevitably involves conflict and differences and this requires clarity, a critical capacity to detect unjust systems and take a stand based on Gospel criteria. This is the price that Jesus paid and led him to give up his life: No one takes my life from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. (John 10:18)

The XVI General Assembly reaffirmed the importance of intervening in situations where there is vulnerability, exclusion or marginalisation, offering “our best academic qualifications, of thought, reflection etc. to serve society, because we firmly believe in the healing power of faith-science dialogue.”7 In Poveda’s teaching, a living faith which generates charity which is united with outstanding knowledge, nourished by study and the critical analysis of the destructive systems that threaten millions of people, is offered as a commitment work together in the process of social and cultural transformation. Faith-science dialogue requires us to be believers who dare to join forums of social debate and intellectual honestly and competently.

To value justice as much as we value life also means paying particular attention to a fundamental expression of our charism: education and formation, key elements in the transformation of society. There is an urgent need to form people who are committed to justice, solidarity, human rights and peace, knowing that this educational process takes place in the everydayness of our lives: in the family and at work; at leisure, in the classroom and in professional life; in relationships and in group activities, among young people and adults; with our own age-group and when the generations are together, that is, whenever we have an opportunity to learn, reflect, study. In regard to justice, we know that what we have is given to us, is of God and is intended for everyone. Could it be that we have wealth - spaces, knowledge, qualities ... stored up which are still not made available to serve a world that so desperately needs these gifts?

To value justice as much as life also means to welcome Pedro Poveda’s call (1920) to live a consistent, serious, lively and courageous faith, which bears fruit in virtues, among them justice: There are many ways of believing, but there is only one that justifies . . . To believe as one should and to remain silent is impossible . . . my believing, my faith, is not wavering, but firm and unshakable and that is why I speak out8.

Pedro Poveda not only describes attitudes but also reminds us of inescapable demands. For Poveda, to confess the faith that we profess and be consistent with that same faith in our life, to the point of shedding our blood for Christ if necessary, as the first Christians did, is the quality of a true believer. True believers speak out to confess the truth that they profess, whenever they should, as they should, before those they should, and to say what they should say.9

What specific actions will express our commitment to justice in 2013?

An international Work, present in more than thirty countries and embodied through numerous languages and cultures needs a variety of actions, appropriate to the reality to which they are addressed. Therefore I propose that there be discernment in each local area to identify and express our response to this shared endeavour for. We ask you to give particular emphasis to forms and ways of being committed to justice in professional and family responsibilities.

We also have in our Association traditions which, while they may need to be updated, can be valid today in their deepest sense: social projects, spaces for reflection and study, solidarity days, international and local volunteering, NGOs, forums and study circles on peace, solidarity, human rights, etc.. Let us be creative, committed and courageous.

I invite you to draw from the attitudes that were proposed in our Advent message: to welcome our own reality, to look at it in a fresh way, from God’s viewpoint, and give courageous and appropriate responses to the here and now. Let us accept our reality with the confidence of one who knows that God, creator of life, is involved in it, tenderly and patiently, with compassion and mercy. We, as instruments, are invited to season, console, heal and accompany.10

In this searching and discernment, listen very specially to the younger generation. As Pedro Poveda said: We are all moving toward the same goal, but we reach it in different ways according to each one’s age and situation.  And in the same text he asks: Who are the most courageous, intrepid, rash, daring? The young. Who have ideals, who forget about themselves, who start the blaze? The young11. The commitment to justice is for every generation, because we must all feel involved in this, but let us allow the younger generations to blaze the trail, push us, lead us, with their enthusiasm and creativity, to new and different places where together we can give new responses to our contemporaries’ thirst for justice.

There are many possibilities within our reach: developing support networks, promoting an economy of solidarity, welcoming immigrant, travelling to understand other cultures and other human situations from within, promoting links between cities, peoples and cultures, fostering communication, making good use of new technologies to create supportive links ...

The Association’s website can be the favoured means of sharing searches, specific actions, the variety of responses that will emerge; from each place where there is a member of the Teresian family this commitment to deepen and live a strong call to justice throughout 2013 can be shared with ease.

Mary, woman of faith, who from the beginning accompanied the disciples of Jesus on the path of faith, most specially the first Christian communities, will accompany us today in our desire for a renewed commitment to a world of justice and solidarity.

Love mercy, love in deed and in truth 12



Something St Augustine said can help us to move into the second aspect of Micah’s prophetic call: Where there is no love there can be no justice.13 The identifier for all that we can do to serve justice is love.

See how they love one another,14 the very people who persecuted the early Christians in Africa said admiringly. The strongest witness we can give one another is to give our life for a just cause, day by day, with humble and selfless love, love expressed in deed and in truth. Pedro Poveda, from the very beginning, spoke strongly and insistently of the centrality of love15, and our spiritual and charismatic tradition has always affirmed that the strongest bond uniting members of the Association is love.

But we might also ask: What is love? Our television screens, our computers, magazines, are full of this quest for love. Many chase after happiness through experiences which leave them deeply dissatisfied. We can feel great frustration, the feeling of never reaching the desired joy, and ultimately, fear that life has no meaning because we have not found an answer to the desire to love and be loved that all human persons carry in the depths of their heart.

The Gospel presents various accounts of Jesus' life that can help us understand what kind of love we mean. Peter is asked straight out, “Peter, do you love me?” (John 21:15) Each of us is asked the same question. This call to love Jesus and love as he does is at the foundation of the existence and vocation of all who are baptised. It is about loving Jesus and loving others as he loves us. Moreover, we love God if we recognize and love Him in the least, in the outsider. This task is a battle for each moment.

This is the love that Jesus expressed in Matthew's Gospel: 25:34.  ”Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me, I was naked and you gave me clothing, I was sick and you took care of me, I was in prison and you visited me.” Then the righteous will answer him, “Lord, when was it that we saw you hungry and gave you food, or thirsty and gave you something to drink? And when was it that we saw you a stranger and welcomed you, or naked and gave you clothing? And when was it that we saw you sick or in prison and visited you?” And the king will answer them, “Truly I tell you, just as you did it to one of the least of these who are members of my family, you did it to me.”

This is Mary’s attitude throughout her life: to live a love that welcomes, gives of itself and serves. Mary welcomes the messenger that God sends to announce unexpected news, welcomes Joseph when life begins to grow within her, she welcomes shepherds surprised to be the first to receive news of an event; Mary welcomes the Magi, who set out in search of a star which, without their knowing, will lead them to Jesus. Mary attends to the need of a couple who, in the middle of their wedding, become aware that they have no more wine. Mary receives the disciples when fear makes them retreat to the Upper Room.  Mary accepts, loves, acts, and meditates in her heart.

All these occasions have been for her -as they are today for us- occasions to continue to welcome God in our brothers and sisters. This speaks to us of the ability to be present in the human and concrete situations of our contemporaries, to grasp what is happening, and to understand the deep meaning of their searching and their needs, because nothing human is alien to us.

Mary not only listens, but also decides and acts. She is practical in how she acts and receives people, going to meet their needs not only out of her own ideas, but from a listening and attentive attitude that lets her connect with others, with their needs and with God in their midst.

The song of the Magnificat springs from her ready departure (cf. Luke 1:39) and the meeting in fellowship of two willing women; a meeting that happens through the experience of a reality and a mystery lived by these two women; a meeting which shows that the eyes of both are fixed firmly on the God’s Promise, allowing them to embrace the mystery of God in their own lives confidently.

Mary is a simple woman; she belongs to the anawim, the poor and faithful remnant of Israel, and proclaims the wonders of the Lord and his affection for little and poor people. In her song Mary communicates the deep meaning of God's intervention in our reality.

The power of her song springs from the way she welcomes, ponders and remembers in faith, which enables her to see an overall meaning in events, and to embrace fully the "great things" God has done among His People for the poor, the humble and the simple.

In 1920 Pedro Poveda has a series of writings on the importance of the bond of charity. In a lay association like ours, where a balance between autonomy and interdependent solidarity is essential, Pedro Poveda describes in a clear and compelling way how to love in deed and in truth: to love in truth is to love in justice what deserves to be loved, to love virtue, holiness, that is, God's part in His creatures, the reflections of His infinite goodness ... We love in deeds when we do something good for others, praying for them, advising, correcting, helping, freeing them from dangers, giving good example, sacrificing ourselves for the sake of their sanctification, helping them at every level. And to love in truth as in deed, which is to love rightly, with order, helpfully, you do not need much talk.16

All our groups and associations, families, groupings, projects and every area where we gather and are sent forth on mission, are theological spaces where we can experience God’s love of and the love of our brothers and sisters. Within the various relationships that make up our daily lives we learn to love in deed and in truth, as we can give witness of our decision to love and to forgive. Is there anyone among us who, by our affinities or stances, may be left out of our own community?17

In this context of wanting to love in deed and in truth we recall the challenge of the priority set by the 17th General Assembly: To live and create fellowship, prophetic sign of the Kingdom, which supports us and moves us to mission. To live and create fellowship is to welcome our brothers and sisters in the specific and real attitudes that acknowledge each person in his or her difference, originality and dignity; this is the setting in which we can build true fellowship.

We see in our culture, especially in the West, the continual growth of individualism and along with it loneliness and a lack of appreciation for togetherness and the common good. At the same time we share our lives more and more with other cultures, ethnically diverse people, other civilizations, other faiths and customs. In this world which has become so small we live in a society of intermingled cultures and languages. This shows us that our experience of the world is not the only one, nor necessarily the best, that other human experiences add richness and extraordinary value to the shared world that we have to build up, and that diversity is not primarily a problem or a difficulty but an opportunity for true love, a challenge to the wonderful gift of creativity, an opportunity for in-depth dialogue and a basic reason to believe, hope, serve and celebrate.

We live in societies that have long ceased to be homogenous in culture, becoming pluralist landscapes where the challenge of difference is an integral part of our daily lives. Difference makes us understand that all of us are needed to build up our common humanity. Can we appreciate the deep joy and love for life that beats in African cultures? The thirst for justice and solidarity that runs in the veins of Latin American culture? The sense of adoration before Mystery, the meditation, silence and reverence of the Asian soul? The hard-working and constant search for truth throughout the history of European cultures? Will we be able to share sensitivities, appreciate nuances and coordinate efforts? Will we know how to join virtue to our faith, to virtue, knowledge ... 18 in a whole that excludes no good thing?

Based on the values of our Teresian vocation, with its incarnation spirituality, we feel called not only to accept difference but to love it, to foster it, that is, to go out of ourselves in seeking the good of others, their development, their growth, the deep and unique value of their whole being.


What specific actions will fulfil our desire to love in deed and truth in 2013?

Again we invite you to look at your reality and let yourselves be touched by it. But we also want to remember the agreement drawn up at the XVII General Assembly by proposing a specific sign of solidarity in 2013.

The Gospel also invites us to a simple lifestyle, and invites the believer to attend to and look at reality in a way that leads us to set ourselves limits, not out of obligation but out of love, not out of a poorly understood austerity but by free choice, born of the desire for greater solidarity.

When Pedro Poveda proposed the early Christian communities as a foundational reference, he did so for several reasons. Among these is the communion of goods, sharing. As members of the Teresian Association this invitation becomes especially pressing for us in a time of so much social uncertainty for many of our contemporaries. It is a call to discover the value of a lifestyle and an attitude towards the use of material goods that would be a sign of justice and solidarity.

At every decisive moment in her life Mary lived deeply the experience of how her love was tested and filled with feelings, questions, searchings, joys, doubts and fears. Yet once again she surrendered herself trustingly to her God: Do whatever he tells you (John 2:5)

Let us learn to love through trust and forgiveness, a spirit of welcome and respect, so that our life of fellowship reflects that of Jesus: Having loved his own who were in the world, he loved them to the end. (John 13,1)Let us hope that during the year we are beginning, the words of this song will become reality: Look how they love one another, they are the salt. Love is justice and forgiveness; love surrenders, love is blessing. Love reaches out to others, it liberates, lights up, accompanies19.

Walking humbly with God – because all strength, all security and all hope is from God, through God and in God 20

Whatever our culture, our age or our history, all human beings have a common hope, a thirst for fullness of life which God alone can satisfy. Will we allow ourselves to be led deeper by this thirst? We know from experience that the more we search for God the more we discover to our amazement: it is God who has been searching for us.

The human heart overflows with desires and longings. Deciding which longings should be our first priority, being attentive to what is happening within us, make us listen to God. God does in fact speak through our desires and longings. We for our part need to discern God’s voice amidst so many others within ourselves.

Allowing our thirst for God to find expression within us does not lead to our withdrawal from concern for our contemporary world. On the contrary, this very thirst helps us to acknowledge thattoday’s world is reawakening to the spiritual dimension of life; perhaps we are called to make this faith, which fills us with life, accessible to others too.

To walk humbly with God allows this deepest longing to awaken within us: the desire for God! Certainly, the spirit of wonder and awe are not easy to maintain in a society which values instant efficiency so much. Nonetheless, in those moments of inner silence, when apparently nothing seems to be happening, the Holy Spirit is working within us, at times without us even realising how.

The life of Jesus introduces us to this perspective: He allowed himself to be led by the Spirit and never ceased to be aware of the presence of God the Father in his life. This is the basis of his freedom and his self-surrender. Likewise, we tend towards this desire for the absolute, this hunger to love and to be loved which no one or nothing can extinguish within us.

We need to know how to wait for God’s opportune time in our lives...To be there, to stay in simplicity, and gratuitously. We can be mindful of God present in our waiting. We can learn to be still within ourselves as an expression of our openness to God. As people of faith surrounded by the powerful secularisation of some cultures, will we be able to find in the sacred space within ourselves a source of renewal of the ways we welcome God into our lives?

We are currently living through a special and unique time in human history. We are convinced that in order to draw close to God’s abundant riches, we need all voices, all peoples, all religions.No religion is so poor that it cannot offer something; neither is there a religion so perfect that it has nothing to learn. The Second Vatican Council acknowledged that every religion possesses“seeds of truth”21. Every religion has its own light, each offers seeds of hope. In these times, when humanity is living at a more global level, the men and women of our world need complementary ways to search for God. They need the witness of those who are living a deep interior life; they need to become attentive to the aesthetic dimensions of life and to beauty, because the face of God is also revealed there.

This is an important time for ecumenism; from all Christian experiences we must search for the face of God, as manifest in Jesus Christ, convinced as we are that the responsibility for this journey of discovery and proclamation lies with all Christians.

This awareness certainly requires a new way of being present among our contemporaries in daily life; another style and way of understanding our mission and evangelising task.

In the final Message of the Synod of Bishops on the theme: The New Evangelisation, we read the following words: We wish to emphasise that the new evangelisation refers firstly to ourselves(...) In order to be capable of evangelising our world, the Church must above all, listen attentively to the Word. The invitation to evangelise becomes a call to conversion. Evangelisation rests on this serene sure foundation. We trust in the power of the Spirit, Who will teach us what we should say and do: we overcome fear with faith, tiredness with hope, indifference with love...The promise of Jesus accompanies us: “ Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.” (John 14: 27).22

To walk humbly with God, we must listen deeply and with receptive openness to his word. To become familiar with the word of God in a personal way, and at group and association levels, allowing it to challenge us, is a sure way to continue to grow in our experience of faith, along with those who are part of our daily lives, within and outside the Church community.

We are invited therefore to make a special space for the word of God throughout this year, as an essential factor which sets us on the road.
In doing so we will acknowledge and welcome our own search for God. Let us give it an essential and specific space in our personal lives and in our group gatherings, allowing ourselves to be challenged and transformed by it.

In 1917 Pedro Poveda emphasised to us as founder in the process of developing his work: You must make a special effort to know the life of Jesus Christ well, studying the holy Gospels with love . . . It is there that you will find the prototype that you should all imitate. Learn to be humble like Jesus, like Jesus, prudent, strong, patient, kind-hearted, compassionate, charitable. Pray like him and with him; prepare yourselves for your apostolic mission as the Master prepared himself23.

Through the Word our friendship with God is strengthened, our encounter with Jesus becomes more alive, because it reveals to us our own identity and the essential dimension of our vocation- mission.

Through the Word, we are impelled to discern God’s ways and to direct our lives towards God’s Kingdom. God’s Word challenges us and opens new horizons, guiding us in how to discern the seeds of the Word in the course of history.

In the Annunciation dialogue, Mary becomes deeply engaged with God’s timely entrance into her personal history. This dialogue, which takes her totally by surprise, becomes transformed for Mary into a simple, deep, sensitive dialogue, a dialogue of faith, love and trust in God, for Whom nothing is impossible (Luke 1:37). In this faith dialogue God is revealed as God, likewise she herself becomes revealed.

Mary Mary listens, welcomes, and makes herself available before this Mystery: “Mary said, ‘Here am I, the servant of the Lord; let it be according to your word’ Then the angel departed from her”  (Luke 1:38)  Through faith we believe that this dialogue changed the course of history forever for humankind.

Let us turn to Mary to become transformed into servants of the Word. She, who welcomed the Word; she, in whom this Word became living flesh and hope, will accompany us today on our mission to become salt and light around the world.


Which signs will accompany our search for God, our longing for God?

The Teresian Association web page can become a favoured space in which we can share the paths we travel with our contemporaries in search of God; there we can acknowledge their seeking through the mediums of art, music, painting, songs, poetry, science, justice. . . Let us offer from our diversity of languages and cultures the great richness that is inherent in the thirst and longing for God in our world. Let us seek with others the face of God which Jesus revealed and which the Spirit continues to reveal to the simple and pure of heart.

The word that will accompany our search and commitment to justice in this Year of Faith, loving in deed and truth, and walking humbly in search of God is:

Blessed are you who believed (cf Luke 1:45)


Notes:

1: PEDRO POVEDA. Creí por eso hablé, -295-. 1928
2 -434- 1934.
3 -43- 1909
4 Counsel for Culture. Una misión transformadora para un mundo en cambio, Roma 2011
5 -521- 1936
6 Plenary Assembly  ad experimentum 2011, p. 87
7 XVI  Genera General l, 2006 "La Institución Teresiana en los albores del siglo XXI comprometida con su futuro". pp.. 158-22.
8 -158- 1920
9 Ibid.
10 Advent and Christmas Message 2012
11 409- 1936
12 173- 1920
13 Saint Augustine, De Gratia Christi I, 26,27
14 TERTULIANO, Apologético, 39,7
15 49- 1911
16 173- 1920
17 Advent and Christmas Message 2012
18 -111- 1919
19 GRUPO ALHARACA, Palabras de Vida
20 297 1929
21 Nostra Aetate, 2
22 Final Message of the Synod of Bishops on the New Evangelization for the Transmission of Faith, Rome, October 26, 2012
23 84-1917

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